Bookmarks: design tips and examples for haiku poets

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Bookmarks are a great promotional tool for writers and poets. To create a good bookmark for your next haiku conference, you’ll need:

  • image
  • text
  • contact information (name, e-mail, website)
Bookmark by Frank Carey

Bookmark by Frank Carey

This bookmark by Frank C Carey is one of my favorite freebies. On the front, there’s a photo with a haiku. At the back, there’s a red seal, a QR code, and Frank’s contact information. The design is clean and easy to read.

The bookmark is laminated. I like the addition of the twine: the color matches the photo. Not only is the bookmark beautiful, but it is also practical and durable. It’s been, and still is, my favorite bookmark to use.  Every once in a while, I would see the address on the bookmark and visit Frank’s website, so I would say this bookmark was an effective promotional tool for its author.

(Unfortunately, Frank’s website is no longer active. He says he’s been out of the haiku game but continues to write science fiction. Considering I visited his website 3-4 times in 2 years, the bookmark did a good job in promoting him.)

Moon bookmark

I like this bookmark by Jennifer Sutherland. The design is beautiful. However, it doesn’t have the author’s contact information (website, e-mail).

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Moon bookmark, by Jennifer Sutherland (HNA 2015)

I like the simplicity of this laminated bookmark, but I don’t know the name of the author.

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You can get creative with the photo and text alignment, like Margaret Beverland from New Zealand.

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Bookmarks by Margaret Beverland

Why not use a different material, like a tag made of cloth?

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Tag by Wanda Cook ; bookmark by an unknown author

You can also add more than one haiku, following this example by Claudia Coutu Radmore

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Bookmark by Clauda Coutu Radmore

Kala Ramesh created this beautiful bookmark with haiku, line drawing, and decorative twine.

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Stanford Forrester used a printing press to create his bookmarks. This means he selected each font, placed them, and aligned them in a printing press, added the ink and printed the bookmarks one at a time.

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Bookmark, by Stanford M Forrester

Tips for designing bookmarks:

  • Make it beautiful so people will keep it.
  • Add a twine so the bookmark won’t get lost in a book.
  • Create them months in advance (it takes time to print them)

Are you thinking about creating  a bookmark as your freebie for the next Haiku North America conference? I hope these examples inspire you.

In the next post, I’ll write about creating postcards.

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Haiku Canada 2015 – Haiku and New Technologies

coasts_and_islandsI gave a talk at the Haiku Canada weekend on Sunday May 17 2015 in Victoria, B.C.

The title of my presentation was: Thousand Islands: Publishing Haiku using new technology, from Twitter Haiku to iPad Haiga

 Synopsis:

Come explore a real archipelago of publishing options for the web, social media, and beyond.  This presentation offers an overview of the most innovative haiku projects available on new platforms, such as blogs, Twitter haiku, iPad haiga, video poems, podcasts, guerrilla haiku, art installations, and other experiments in the public space.  Jessica Tremblay will show you the best of the best in this lightning speed presentation which aims to inspire you to try new technology for your own projects. Don’t be stuck in one place when there are so many islands to explore!

As promised, here are the links to the websites I talked about. Have fun exploring these new technologies and finding new ways to share your haiku!

If you have a haiku blog, website, twitter account, feel free to share the links with us in the comments section.

Blogs

Twitter Haiku

iPad haiga

  • Alexis Rotella (some ipad art postcards on her homepage but Alexis Rotella shares her work mainly on her private Facebook page and on Twitter)
  • Kris Kondo (AKA Kris Moon) – shares her work mainly on her private Facebook page

FlipBooks

 Podcastshaiku-chronicles-issa

Haiku-Video

Travellers Dream

Watch Travellers Dream, a beautiful haiga-renku sequence by Ron C. Moss and Jim Swift on Vimeo.

“Traveller’s Dream is a renku-like sequence of haiga using a new format. Each verse links to 2 images and each image (except first and last) links to two verses.

“Ron wrote the first (3-line) verse to link to my starting image and the also provided an image to link to the same verse. Jim then wrote a 2-line verse to link to Ron’s image and also provided an image to link to his verse, and so on.”

— Jim Swift (published in Haigaonline volume 14 issue 2 October 2013)