Haidan – May 2016 issue

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Since January 2016, Old Pond Comics is published in Japan. I’ve been working with Emiko Miyashita, a haiku poet who is writing a monthly column on haiku translations for the new journal Haidan. Every month, Emiko sends me three haiku and I provide a haiku-cartoon to accompany her article.

The publisher sends me copies of the journals, but only months after publication, so Emiko occasionally sends me pictures of what the article looks like as soon as she gets her copy.

Here’s a photo of the May 2016 issue showing beautiful Japanese items on her desk. She gave me permission to share this.

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Haidan (May 2016 issue). Photo by Emiko Miyashita.

 

Here’s the comic:

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In the distant hills

A patch where sunlight touches

The withered meadows.

— Kyoshi (haiku translated by Donald Keene)

New Year : “The Fifth Season” in haiku

haiku rhblythIn publications, it’s common to see haiku poems organized in four sections named after the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter.  But in some traditional Japanese haiku books, you’ll sometimes find a fifth section, or fifth “season”, dedicated to the New Year. It’s because “The New Year is a season by itself”, wrote R.H. Blyth in Haiku.

Blyth explains that New Year used to be celebrated in the spring:

“When the lunar calendar was in vogue, January the First was what is now about the beginning of February. Plum was blooming in sheltered places, and the spirit of spring was already in the air.” (R.H. Blyth, Haiku)

That’s why in the New Year section, you’ll often find spring haiku like this one:

Even my shadow
Is safe and sound and in the best of health,
This first morning of spring.

Issa (Tr. R.H. Blyth)

Spring turns to Winter

In 1873, after Japan moved to the Gregorian calendar, New Year’s Day was celebrated on January 1st.

The Fifth Season

Some western translators who were accustomed to four seasons – spring, summer, autumn, winter – weren’t sure how deal with the New Year section in haiku books.

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Haiku, Volume 2: Spring, by R.H. Blyth. The New Year has its own section. (Hokuseido Press)

Some editors kept a separate section for New Year – sometimes referred to as “The Fifth Season” (although it’s technically the first) – which was often placed before the spring section.

Other editors integrated the New Year’s haiku in the spring section so they could stick to the four seasons known in the Western world. Therefore, New Year’s haiku would be found at the beginning of the spring section, with the spring haiku.

So, if you are looking for New Year’s haiku in an anthology or a saijiki, look at the table of contents for a separate New Year section, or browse the beginning of the spring section.

Interesting fact

In R.H. Blyth’s Haiku, The New Year is a separate section that appears in Volume 2: Spring, before the Spring haiku section.haiku fayard

When Roger Munier (Haiku, Editions Fayard, 1979) translated a selection of haiku from R.H. Blyth’s book in French, he integrated the New Year haiku with the spring section.

There might be two explanations for this:

  • he thought there weren’t enough New Year haiku to create a separate section for them (he translated 10 New Year poems, or 4 pages, while R.H. Blyth had about 50 haiku with commentaries displayed over 20 pages), or
  • he didn’t want to confuse the public or write a long explanation about why New Year haiku have their own section.

So, similar content, but two ways to deal with the Fifth Season.

What would you do if you were in this situation? Would you keep The Fifth Season?

The First Dream of the Year

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In Japan, the first dream of the year (Hatsuyume) is deemed to reveal something about the year to follow. A common greeting in Japan around that time of the year, but especially on January 2nd, is “What was your first dream of the year?” (Donna hatsuyume o mita?)

The first dream of the year;
I kept it a secret,
And smiled to myself.

Shō-u (Tr. R.H. Blyth)

Since people stayed up all night on December 31, the first dream of the year was actually the one occurring on the night of January 1st. That’s why January 2nd is known as Hatsuyume (day of The First Dream of the Year) in Japan.

op-first-dream-of-the-yearIt was particularly lucky if you dreamed about Mount Fuji, a hawk, or an eggplant.

I hope you had a good dream. Best wishes for the New Year!